Aromatic Hydrocarbons


Aromatic Hydrocarbons (or Arenes) are Hydrocarbons, which are made up only of hydrogen and carbon atoms, which form a cyclic compound with resonant double bonds that are associated. They have a molecular formula CnHn, like benzene (C6H6). They are compounds that have exceptional stability. Due to its intense and pleasant aroma, a large number of its derivatives are called aromatic compounds. They are toxic.

Thanks to a large amount of chemical stability associated with the benzene structure and, in general terms, with all the aromatic components. This is because they are planar, chemical, cyclic structures that have numerous double bonds mixed in, providing a large electronic delocalization in their system.

All derivatives of benzene, as long as the ring remains intact, are considered aromatic. Aromaticity can be extended to polycyclic systems, such as phenanthrene, anthracene, naphthalene and other more complicated ones, in which cations and anions can be included, such as pentadienyl, which is formed by the appropriate number of π electrons and also has the ability to create resonant shapes.

Aromatic hydrocarbons are important in the economy and the economy has increased steadily since coal tar naphtha came into use as a rubber solvent in the early 19th century. Currently, the most frequent uses of aromatic compounds as pure products are: synthetic rubber, paints, the chemical synthesis of plastic, explosives, pigments, detergents, perfumes, drugs and pesticides. They are also used as solvents, in the form of mixtures and in variable proportions, of gasoline.

Currently, the most frequent uses of aromatic compounds as pure products are: synthetic rubber, paints, the chemical synthesis of plastic, explosives, pigments, detergents, perfumes, drugs and pesticides.

Cumene is used as a high-octane ingredient in jet fuels, as a feedstock for phenol synthesis, as a solvent for cellulose paints and lacquers, and as acetone for the pyrolysis production of styrene. As in a number of commercial solvents derived from petroleum, with boiling points between 150 and 160 ° C. It is a good solvent for fats and resins and for this reason has been used as a substitute for benzene in many of its industrial uses.

p-cymene is obtained by hydrogenation of monocyclic terpenes and is present in many essential oils. It is primarily used, along with other solvents and aromatic hydrocarbons, and is a by-product of the sulphite pulping process and as a lacquer and varnish thinner.

Coumarin is used as an odor enhancer in soaps, as a deodorant, tobacco, perfumes, and rubber products. It is also used in pharmaceutical preparations. Banned as a solvent and component of dry cleaning fluids in many countries, benzene has also been banned as a component of products intended for household use.